Saints of the Week: Acindynus, Pegasius, Aphthonius, Elpidophorus and Anempodistus of Persia

Here they are in a very Byzantine icon.

Today on All Saints Day, I bring back the saint of the week. And this week, you get five-for-one! These five saints are martyrs commemorated on 2 November in the Orthodox Church. I am uncertain whether they are remembered by the Miaphysite communions and the ‘Nestorian’ Church of the East, but I expect they are, given the year and location of their martyrdom.

The typical version of church history we all know and love paints a fairly grim picture of life before Constantine (which wasn’t as bad as you’d think) and then transpires the Peace of the Church. Persecution is over! Churches can be built publicly — even at public expense! Bishops can live in the open — with tax exemptions! And so on and so forth.

There is a debate as to whether the Peace of the Church was a good thing or not.

But you know whom it did not necessarily profit?

Christians outside the Roman Empire.

Christians within the Empire became a protected species. And the Roman Emperor came to see himself as the great patron of all Christians, whether they were his subjects or not. At times, this meant telling the Persian Emperor what to do, which was not the sort of thing that went down well with Persian Emperors — particularly Shapur II ‘the Great’, the longest-reigning Sassanian monarch (r. 309-379).

It also meant that when hostilities between the two Empires ramped up (a frequent occurance), Christians in Persian lands could become targets of the Sassanian monarchy — seen as foreign sympathisers. Christians often felt safer within Roman territory; thus, when the city of Nisibis fell to the Persian army in 363, St Ephraim the Syrian and a group of Syriac-speaking ecclesiastics moved the School of Nisibis to the city of Edessa in Roman territory.

During Shapur’s golden era, the Christians of Persia encountered persecution just as their siblings of Roman lands had in years past. For the most part, it seems that Shapur’s targets were high-level ecclesiastics such as Shemon Bar Shabbae or Bishop Acepsimas of Hnaita.

Unfortunately, I do not know enough about Persian Christianity in Late Antiquity or the sources for Byzantine hagiography to corroborate the story of the five martyrs for this week, so what I’m telling you about the events of 376 should be taken with caution — I take it from abbamoses.com. In fact, I’ll just reproduce it here for you:

Acindynus, Pegasius and Anempodistus were courtiers to King Shapur II of Persia. When the king began a fierce persecution of Christians, the three withdrew from court to a private house and, fearless of their own safety, openly exhorted their fellow-Christians to stand firm in their faith. For this they were arrested and brought before their former lord, who subjected them to many cruel tortures, from which they emerged miraculously unscathed. Seeing this, one of the king’s soldiers, named Aphthonius, embraced the Faith and was immediately beheaded. The former courtiers were then put to further tortures, but their only effect was to convince Elpidophorus, a distinguished nobleman, and seven thousand other Persians to faith in Christ. All were beheaded, but not before receiving holy Baptism. The trials of the three continued, but once again they were preserved, and even the king’s mother was led to the true faith. Finally they were killed (the account does not say how), receiving the crown of martyrdom along with the king’s mother and twenty-eight others.

This could likely be true. It’s at least the same sort of story as we find about martyrs under the Romans. Again, I have no knowledge of the sources for this quintet of martyrs so cannot say one way or the other. The Persian persecutions serve to remind us of the wider world of Christianity, not just today, but throughout all generations. It is common to remind people that Christianity was not born in Europe — it is also worth keeping in mind that the missions and growth of the Church in the Patristic period did not restrict themselves to the Roman Empire.

They also remind us that Christians in the lands of the former Persian Empire face persecution to this day, whether from the likes of ISIS or the legitimised government of Iran.

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2 thoughts on “Saints of the Week: Acindynus, Pegasius, Aphthonius, Elpidophorus and Anempodistus of Persia

  1. The history of Christianity outside Europe is far too little known. Peter Brown’s The Rise of Western Christendom (which, despite its title, ranges from Ireland to Central Asia) captures some of the extraordinary richness and diversity that characterized the early church.

    Being currently in the Republic of Georgia, I’ve been reading through this online hagiography collection: http://www.pravoslavie.ru/english/7213.htm . Quite astonishing the number of martyrs and saint-scholars this obscure little country has produced over its 1700+ years of Christian history.

    • Thanks for the link to the saints of Georgia!

      Peter Brown at large is very good at helping the reader take an expansive look at Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, whether discussing The Cult of the Saints in the West or ‘The Rise and Function of the Holy Man’ in Syria or simply The World of Late Antiquity. I’ll have to finally read The Rise of Western Christendom — I’m glad it is broad in its scope! I am very pleased to see many correctives to our (understandably) Eurocentric vision of early Christianity.

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