The Psalms at the heart of prayer and worship

After my criticisms of Tim Keller, here’s my latest post on a different blog where I express appreciation for his book on prayer — more importantly, let’s keep the Psalms at the heart of our prayers. Maybe even bring them back into Sunday worship where they’ve been laid aside?

thewitnesscloud

Praying the offices daily, whether it’s BCP or BAS or Common Worship or Celebrating Daily Prayer or the Roman Breviary or the Benedictine office or the offices of the eastern churches, you will find yourself praying through the book of Psalms in a regular cycle, whether that cycle is weekly, fortnightly, monthly, or maybe bi-monthly. Or, if not the entire book, you will still pray one or two Psalms at each office every day.

The Psalms have been called God’s Prayer Book and God’s Hymn Book. They are the source of much rich depth and beauty in the entire history of prayer and worship, and the office is one means of making them our own. They express the full range of human emotion in interactions with God, and they help us find an approach to God we might otherwise avoid if left to our own devices.

The Psalms are an…

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