The nourishment of historic liturgy

Liturgy doesn’t get more historic than this baby

We have been worshipping with the Anglican Church of Canada (the denomination in which I grew up) for a while now (recall my post about beauty). As this blog should make abundantly clear, I am very much a pro-BCP kind of guy. The BCP stands in perfect continuity with the medieval Roman Rite according to the Use of Sarum and thus with ancient liturgy, part of a large international family that includes Mozarabic (medieval Spanish) liturgy and the Ambrosian Rite of Milan and various local liturgies of the early Middle Ages in the West, and the many beautiful liturgies of the East — St John Chrysostom, St Basil, St Mark, Sts Addai and Mari, St James, and those that largely exist as relics such as that of Hippolytus. More succinctly, the BCP is not only part of this big family but also beautiful, elegant, and theologically rich, expressing the great tradition in a properly Reformational mode for public worship.

As I say, we’re going to a local Anglican Church of Canada parish. As Bishop Michael Hawkins of Saskatchewan put it, there has been an illegal suppression of the Prayer Book in the Anglican Church of Canada. And even where the suppression has not been illegal (that is, contrary to the canon law of the church), it has certainly gone on. Most parishes, liberal or conservative, low church or mid- or even high church, with organ and choir or guitar or slightly out of tune piano, use The Book of Alternative Services (BAS) that was approved by the General Synod in 1983. Thus, at both parishes we’ve frequented in 2022, the worship was ordered according to the BAS using the prayers from the BAS.

You’d think, then, that I would be raging, wouldn’t you? Isn’t this the caricature of BCP-lovers? Or maybe disdainful. Ugh. BAS. *Shudder.*

And, while I think the BCP is theologically, poetically, and historically superior, after my years of journeying through those with little liturgy and those with do-it-yourself liturgy, I have come to appreciate the BAS. The Book of Alternative Services is one of those post-Vatican II liturgical movement creations. Many such creations are terrible; let’s not pretend otherwise. I’ve met some of them.

But the actual roots and origins of that liturgical movement were not the tossing out of tradition or a desire for novelty or even a desire to be relevant that now plagues evangelicalism. In fact — setting aside the question of whether post-Vatican II liturgy was successful — the goal was to be faithful to the primitive liturgy and the spirit and theology that undergirds it.

Mostly, anyway.

Changing, “And with thy spirit,” into, “And also with you,” is not in the spirit of the early liturgy.

Anyway, these prayers, even if crafted by modernists, were often put together with the intention of providing a modern language resource that has the same theological import as the ancient and medieval prayers. I have not yet found anything directly objectionable in the prayers of the BAS as they stand — I think some of the rubrics mean trouble, because they seem to make confession of sin optional, and the Eucharistic prayer that claims to represent the 1962 BCP makes some major changes.

In other words, it’s good to be home. I am an Anglican. My preferred religion may, of course, be some kind of medieval Catholicism that does not exist. But I grew up in the Anglican Church of Canada using these prayers and following this liturgical flow. There is comfort here, and there is even nourishment, giving food to the soul, even if the plate is a modern affair (imagine the BCP as fine porcelain, I guess?).

I’ll leave us there without getting into my dissatisfactions with “do-it-yourself liturgy”. If you’re in Canada and can’t find a Prayer Book church, the Lord will bless you and meet with you through the BAS. I promise. He’s big enough to do that.

3 thoughts on “The nourishment of historic liturgy

  1. […] Juicy Ecumenism John Calvin & God’s Civil Government – Richard Turnbull at Acton Institute The Nourishment of Historic Liturgy – M. J. H. at Classically Christian Latest Presbyterian Church (USA) Declines Reflect Decade-Long […]

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